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Playa d'en Bossa Travel Guide - Discover Playa d'en Bossa

Leisure and Culture

  • What are the Best Beaches in Ibiza?
    Ibiza beaches are known to be some of the best in the world, with sugar-fine sands, turquoise blue waters, and spectacular sunsets. There’s a wide variety of ways to enjoy the long, beautiful coastline of Ibiza: beaches in Playa d’en Bossa are lively, with activities and beach bars to keep you having fun in the sun for hours. If you’d prefer a more chilled experience, the beaches in Santa Eulalia are where you should be heading.   
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      Caló des Moro

      Caló des Moro is one of the best beaches in San Antonio. It’s a small beach, just around the corner from the more crowded main area, where the clear, shallow waters are great for dipping, and there are sun loungers along the sand for basking in the warm sunshine. The promenade that winds along San Antonio’s coast begins here, so it’s perfectly situated for a stroll at sunset.

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      Playa de las Salinas

      Playa de las Salinas, situated on the southernmost point of Ibiza, is a long beach, curling across the bay with soft white sand and small gentle waves. It’s one of the coolest beaches in Playa d’en Bossa, with a lively energy and beautiful landscapes. Salinas is home to some of Ibiza’s best beach bars, where you can enjoy an array of delicious cocktails while you dance the night away in the warm Mediterranean air.

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      Cala Boix

      Located on the eastern side of Ibiza, Cala Boix is a hidden gem. It’s encircled by high cliffs,resulting in stunning views as well as a sense of privacy, and the dark, pebbly sand is a welcome contrast to the sparkling water. It’s the ultimate place to escape the crowds when the weather is calm, and when there’s a bit of wind, it’s great for body-surfing.

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      Cala Saladeta

      Situated not too far from the popular Cala Salada beach lies this tranquil hideaway. It’s a quiet bay which can be reached by a short walk over a rocky divide - but you’ll be instantly rewarded by the calm energy of this lesser-known treasure. There’s very little water activity here, making it one of the most ideal beaches in San Antonio for snorkelling, and rock-diving into the deep blue waters.

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      Es Bol Nou

      Es Bou Nol is a picturesque cove, surrounded by tall orange cliffs that complement the crystal-clear sea that stretches out towards the horizon. Also known as Sa Caleta, this beach is very popular with families, as the shallow water is ideal for little ones to splash around in.

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      Cala Gració

      Cala Gració is one of the loveliest beaches in San Antonio, with azure waters and fine golden sand. The small, sheltered bay boasts a stretch of deep water, making Cala Gració a great swimming beach just a few minutes away from the buzz of San Antonio. Given its location on the island, it provides the perfect setting for enjoying a cocktail as the sun goes down.

    • You can expect to pay around $8 dollars to rent a sun-lounger, and another $8 for an umbrella. Alternatively, you can bring your own umbrella and a big towel.
    • When eating from a chiringuito (beach bar) make sure your dish is served fresh and hot to lessen the risk of food poisoning.
    • It’s best to take cash with you when going to a market, but be careful not to flash it around. Be aware of pickpockets.
    • Remember to wear sunscreen - the Mediterranean sun can be fierce in the height of summer.
    • There are no common food diseases in Ibiza that you should be aware of, although some travelers choose to take a hepatitis vaccine before traveling just to be safe.
    • Haggling is essential in markets. Always originally offer much less than you intend to spend, and try to meet the vendor halfway. Don’t be afraid to walk away if the terms aren’t to your liking.
    • Although sleeping under the stars may sounds like a great idea, remember it’s illegal to sleep on the beaches in Ibiza.
    • Fish is one of the most popular foods in Ibiza, and is often used to flavour other dishes such as rice. If you’re allergic to fish or shellfish, be very careful about explaining this at restaurants to avoid an allergic reaction.
    • Don’t buy souvenirs at the airport - they’re likely to be much more expensive.
    • If you’d like to access some of the more remote beaches, it’s best to hire a car.
    • In terms of water safety, it is not advisable to drink the tap water in Ibiza. It is recommended that travellers buy bottled water, which is fairly inexpensive.
    • If shopping is your main priority, make sure to visit during September - the ‘rebajas’ or sales are where vendors get rid of their surplus stock, so you’ll have prices of 50% or less.
    • If you do get a stomach bug while travelling in Ibiza, make sure to stay hydrated. It’s always best to travel with rehydration salts, so that they’re easily available.
    • For buying essentials, try to shop where the locals do - in the more touristy areas, you’ll pay higher prices.
  • What are the Best Excursions in Ibiza?
    Ibiza is a place with a rich heritage, and the different cultures which have influenced the island can be easily seen in the cuisine and architecture. From the ancient Carthaginians to Romans and Arabs, they have all had an influence on the development of Ibiza, and many of these landmarks can still be seen today. If you’d like to learn more about the excursions in Ibiza, here’s our list of the places you simply can’t miss.
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      Formentera

      Formentera is the fourth-largest Balearic island, just a few miles south of Ibiza. There is no airport and very few buildings, which means that the island has maintained its local charm and unspoilt energy. A day trip to Formentera could include hiring a bike or scooter to explore your surroundings, enjoying some snacks from the authentic chiringuitos or beach bars, or just lounging on the gorgeous beaches, with shimmering turquoise waters and sugar-fine sand.

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      Iglesia del Puig de Missa

      This fortified church is perched on top of a hill in Santa Eulalia, and can be spotted whilst driving towards the town. The ancient whitewashed structure was built in the 16th century, and services still take place there today. Making the slow stroll up to the church provides travelers with panoramic views of the peninsula, and it’s one of the most popular historical excursions in Ibiza.

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      Dalt Vila (Ibiza Old Town)

      This area of Ibiza town has been a historical centre for thousands of years, and is a stunning example of medieval architecture. The fortified gates at the entrance of this part of the city are a relic of Roman times, and you’ll find aspects of ancient Arab and Catalan heritage as you wander the tiny cobbled streets.

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      Ses Salines Nature Reserve

      Ses Salines Nature Reserve is the biggest protected area in Ibiza. It’s a crucial place for maintaining the ecology of this area, as the endemic seagrass found here helps to support and sustain rich marine life. There are also salt flats that have been used for centuries, and it’s a haven for hundreds of bird species. It’s one of the best excursions in Ibiza for nature-lovers, and there are a number of hiking routes available in the area.

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      Ses Fontanelles Cave Paintings (Cova D’es Vi)

      Hidden a short walk away from the enticing beach of Cala Salada are some amazing prehistoric paintings, estimated to be from the Bronze age. It’s a careful walk up a steep slope to get there, but the views from the top of the cliff are breathtaking - and you’ll be able to get close to a piece of history which is thousands of years old. After seeing the paintings, you could saunter back down to the beach and enjoy lazing on the sand, or pick up a cocktail from the little seaside restaurant nearby.

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      Boat and Catamaran Tours

      A boat trip in Ibiza is essential in order to truly enjoying the coastline of this idyllic island. There are a variety of options depending on what you like - for those who enjoy some electronic beats and cocktails, a party catamaran trip is ideal for the best sunset cruise you’ll ever take. If you’d like something more relaxed, it’s easy to hire a private boat that will take you to some of the less known coves around the island, where you can organise a day of dipping, snorkelling or just sunbathing.

    • You can expect to pay around $8 dollars to rent a sun-lounger, and another $8 for an umbrella. Alternatively, you can bring your own umbrella and a big towel.
    • When eating from a chiringuito (beach bar) make sure your dish is served fresh and hot to lessen the risk of food poisoning.
    • It’s best to take cash with you when going to a market, but be careful not to flash it around. Be aware of pickpockets.
    • Remember to wear sunscreen - the Mediterranean sun can be fierce in the height of summer.
    • There are no common food diseases in Ibiza that you should be aware of, although some travelers choose to take a hepatitis vaccine before traveling just to be safe.
    • Haggling is essential in markets. Always originally offer much less than you intend to spend, and try to meet the vendor halfway. Don’t be afraid to walk away if the terms aren’t to your liking.
    • Although sleeping under the stars may sounds like a great idea, remember it’s illegal to sleep on the beaches in Ibiza.
    • Fish is one of the most popular foods in Ibiza, and is often used to flavour other dishes such as rice. If you’re allergic to fish or shellfish, be very careful about explaining this at restaurants to avoid an allergic reaction.
    • Don’t buy souvenirs at the airport - they’re likely to be much more expensive.
    • If you’d like to access some of the more remote beaches, it’s best to hire a car.
    • In terms of water safety, it is not advisable to drink the tap water in Ibiza. It is recommended that travellers buy bottled water, which is fairly inexpensive.
    • If shopping is your main priority, make sure to visit during September - the ‘rebajas’ or sales are where vendors get rid of their surplus stock, so you’ll have prices of 50% or less.
    • If you do get a stomach bug while travelling in Ibiza, make sure to stay hydrated. It’s always best to travel with rehydration salts, so that they’re easily available.
    • For buying essentials, try to shop where the locals do - in the more touristy areas, you’ll pay higher prices.
  • Where to Have Fun in Ibiza?
    Ibiza is the world’s playground - crowds flock from all over the globe to enjoy the island’s thrilling nightlife, with internationally renowned DJs and spectacular light shows occurring all through the summer. Outside of the clubbing scene, the local culture in Ibiza is a naturally festive one, with traditional festivals celebrating different saints as some Ibiza events to look forward to throughout the year.  
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      Party and Dance at Ushuaïa

      Events at Ushuaïa Ibiza Beach Hotel are some of the hottest on the island, with some of the industry’s top DJs regularly playing world-class beats under an open sky. Hundreds of party-goers dance the evening away with dramatic laser shows and pyrotechnics. There’s a pool area in the middle of the dance floor if you’d prefer to cool off, and it’s one of the best beachside spots for a daytime party too.

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      Concerts at the Ibiza Hard Rock Hotel

      The Ibiza Hard Rock Hotel events are unmissable if you love live music, with popular shows such as ‘Children of the 80s’ every weekend throughout the summer. There’s also a sky lounge called ‘The Ninth’ which offers amazing views off the Ibiza coastline. As the hotel is family-friendly, Hard Rock Hotel events tend to appeal to a wide range of travelers.

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      Medieval Fair in Dalt Vila

      Ibiza has a long and proud history, with Roman, Phoenician, Arab and Christian influences easily found in the story of its past. The Medieval Fair, held in May every year, is where this history is celebrated. With flags, street performers, stalls and historical re-enactments taking place around every corner, you will feel like you’ve gone back in time. It’s also very enjoyable for kids, who will love the games and magic shows.

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      Three Kings Celebration

      Most party events take place throughout the summer, but there are exciting events in Ibiza which are held throughout the year. The Three Kings Celebration (Cavalcada del Reis Mags) takes place in early January, celebrating the three kings in the Christian tale of the birth of Jesus. This is an important holiday across all of Spain, and is celebrated in Ibiza by lavishly decorated floats in a procession through Ibiza town.

    • fiesta-primavera-ibiza.jpg
      Spring Festival in Santa Eulalia

      This is one of the prettiest events in Ibiza, and also one of its oldest and most venerated traditions. To celebrate the coming of spring, horse-drawn carts decorated with flowers flock through the streets of Santa Eulalia. The celebration is said to originate from an occurrence where a chapel on top of the hill in Santa Eulalia collapsed and slid into the sea - but miraculously, none of the congregation was harmed. It’s an enormously festive day, with a vintage car fare and fireworks marking the occasion. Many Ibizans come from all over the island to celebrate for a few days following the parade - and there are many other activities to enjoy, from live music and dancing to competitions and sporting events.

    • fiesta-virgen-carmen.jpg
      Virgen del Carmen Fiesta

      The Virgen del Carmen is the patron saint of fishermen and the sea, and she is celebrated in this fiesta that takes place yearly on 16th July, a public holiday in her honour. The ceremony begins with an open-air mass held by the bishops of Formentera and Eivissa. There’s a procession with a large statue of the Virgin who is carried through the streets by local fishermen, before being placed on a boat and taken out to sea. With sailors in full uniform, ships blowing their horns, and a gathering of fishing boats embellished with flags and decorations, it’s a fantastic authentic event to witness.

    • You can expect to pay around $8 dollars to rent a sun-lounger, and another $8 for an umbrella. Alternatively, you can bring your own umbrella and a big towel.
    • When eating from a chiringuito (beach bar) make sure your dish is served fresh and hot to lessen the risk of food poisoning.
    • It’s best to take cash with you when going to a market, but be careful not to flash it around. Be aware of pickpockets.
    • Remember to wear sunscreen - the Mediterranean sun can be fierce in the height of summer.
    • There are no common food diseases in Ibiza that you should be aware of, although some travelers choose to take a hepatitis vaccine before traveling just to be safe.
    • Haggling is essential in markets. Always originally offer much less than you intend to spend, and try to meet the vendor halfway. Don’t be afraid to walk away if the terms aren’t to your liking.
    • Although sleeping under the stars may sounds like a great idea, remember it’s illegal to sleep on the beaches in Ibiza.
    • Fish is one of the most popular foods in Ibiza, and is often used to flavour other dishes such as rice. If you’re allergic to fish or shellfish, be very careful about explaining this at restaurants to avoid an allergic reaction.
    • Don’t buy souvenirs at the airport - they’re likely to be much more expensive.
    • If you’d like to access some of the more remote beaches, it’s best to hire a car.
    • In terms of water safety, it is not advisable to drink the tap water in Ibiza. It is recommended that travellers buy bottled water, which is fairly inexpensive.
    • If shopping is your main priority, make sure to visit during September - the ‘rebajas’ or sales are where vendors get rid of their surplus stock, so you’ll have prices of 50% or less.
    • If you do get a stomach bug while travelling in Ibiza, make sure to stay hydrated. It’s always best to travel with rehydration salts, so that they’re easily available.
    • For buying essentials, try to shop where the locals do - in the more touristy areas, you’ll pay higher prices.
  • What to eat in Ibiza?
    Ibiza has a fascinating food culture, due to a combination of rich local tradition and the abundance of fresh fish and other ingredients. In recent years, it’s also become the centre of a health-oriented, spiritual movement, so there are many options for fresh, modern fusion cuisine too. There are also a number of tasty local liquors, such as hierbas ibicencas, which is made with herbs and alcohol, with an aniseed base. If you’d like to know more about the best dishes in Ibiza, as well as the best drinks and Ibiza recipes, read on!
    • comer-ibiza.jpg
      The Best Traditional Food From Ibiza

      Ibiza has a fascinating food culture, due to a combination of rich local tradition and the abundance of fresh fish and other ingredients. In recent years, it’s also become the centre of a health-oriented, spiritual movement, so there are many options for fresh, modern fusion cuisine too. There are also a number of tasty local liquors, such as hierbas ibicencas, which is made with herbs and alcohol, with an aniseed base. If you’d like to know more about the best dishes in Ibiza, as well as the best drinks and Ibiza recipes, read on!

    • hacer-bullit-de-peix.jpg
      How to Make Bullit de Peix  

      Prepare the fish by cutting it into pieces to salt it.Sauté the potatoes and green peppers, and chop the garlic with the tomato and parsley. Add this mixture to the casserole with the potatoes.Add water or fish stock until all the ingredients in the pot are covered. Let it boil for 10 minutes.Pour saffron and a splash of white wine, and add the fish into the pan little by little (depending on the hardness of each piece).Boil for about 10 or 15 minutes, until the fish and potatoes are ready (you can add more broth or water, if necessary).Use the surrounding broth to cook the rice that accompanies this delicious dish.

    • licores-bebidas-ibiza.jpg
      Liquors and Drinks you Must Taste in Ibiza

      One of the best things to drink in Ibiza is hierbas ibicencas, a digestive liquor which has been used on the island for over 200 years. It’s flavoured with aniseed, orange, thyme and other herbs. Most people are already familiar with the delicious sangria, a refreshing mix of seltzer, red wine and rum with chopped fruit, which you’ll find served with a different twist at every beach bar. If you’d rather stick to non-alcoholic beverages, try some freshly-squeezed juice, also known as zumo fresco. This is very popular in Ibiza, especially in summer when the fruit and vegetables are perfectly ripe.

    • You can expect to pay around $8 dollars to rent a sun-lounger, and another $8 for an umbrella. Alternatively, you can bring your own umbrella and a big towel.
    • When eating from a chiringuito (beach bar) make sure your dish is served fresh and hot to lessen the risk of food poisoning.
    • It’s best to take cash with you when going to a market, but be careful not to flash it around. Be aware of pickpockets.
    • Remember to wear sunscreen - the Mediterranean sun can be fierce in the height of summer.
    • There are no common food diseases in Ibiza that you should be aware of, although some travelers choose to take a hepatitis vaccine before traveling just to be safe.
    • Haggling is essential in markets. Always originally offer much less than you intend to spend, and try to meet the vendor halfway. Don’t be afraid to walk away if the terms aren’t to your liking.
    • Although sleeping under the stars may sounds like a great idea, remember it’s illegal to sleep on the beaches in Ibiza.
    • Fish is one of the most popular foods in Ibiza, and is often used to flavour other dishes such as rice. If you’re allergic to fish or shellfish, be very careful about explaining this at restaurants to avoid an allergic reaction.
    • Don’t buy souvenirs at the airport - they’re likely to be much more expensive.
    • If you’d like to access some of the more remote beaches, it’s best to hire a car.
    • In terms of water safety, it is not advisable to drink the tap water in Ibiza. It is recommended that travellers buy bottled water, which is fairly inexpensive.
    • If shopping is your main priority, make sure to visit during September - the ‘rebajas’ or sales are where vendors get rid of their surplus stock, so you’ll have prices of 50% or less.
    • If you do get a stomach bug while travelling in Ibiza, make sure to stay hydrated. It’s always best to travel with rehydration salts, so that they’re easily available.
    • For buying essentials, try to shop where the locals do - in the more touristy areas, you’ll pay higher prices.
  • What are the Best Things to do in Ibiza?
    There are so many things to do on this beautiful Mediterranean island - from hiking in forgotten valleys to speeding around the coast on a speedboat, there’s an activity for every kind of traveler. If you’re wondering what to do in Ibiza, we’ve rounded up some of our favourite activities below.  Whether you’re traveling alone, as a family or with friends, you’ll find the perfect excursion in our Ibiza travel guide.
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      Boat Tours

      Exploring the island by boat is one of the best things to do in Ibiza, and something that most travelers do as soon as they arrive. There are a number of options, from a sunset catamaran trip where the champagne flows endlessly, or a smaller speed boat if you’d like to have a taste of adrenalin. A very popular day trip for boat tours is the untouched island of Formentera, just 20 miles from Playa d’en Bossa.

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      Water Sports

      Given that Ibiza has so many different kinds of beaches, it’s a great place for active travelers to explore a number of different watersports. If you’d like to admire the marine life without going far from shore, you’ll find hidden beaches with deep, clear water perfect for snorkelling. For others, A SUP tour is a beautiful way to explore the hidden coves and caves of Ibiza’s coastline, and the calm water is ideal for beginners. It’s also possible to rent kayaks straight from the beachfront, and go get some exercise while checking out the sights. For divers, some of Europe’s best dive sites are dotted around Ibiza, including a shipwreck and a sunken lighthouse, and the brilliant Cave of Light near San Antonio.

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      Jeep and 4X4 Tours

      Some of the island’s most scenic areas are not easily accessible - and for adventure-lovers, a 4x4 tour is one of the best activities in Ibiza for getting there. There are a number of tours available, from a morning excursion to a full-day epic that explores the entire island. You’ll be able to learn from the knowledgeable guides, who will tell you more about the nature and history of Ibiza as you bump along winding dirt roads to the best vantage points.

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      Walking Tours

      Once you venture beyond the well-populated coast, active tourism in Ibiza offers many options for hiking or walking. For very fit travelers, there are a number of hiking options, including the historical hidden valley, Es Broll de Buscastell, which is just outside of San Antonio. You could also take a more relaxed walking tour through the old town of Ibiza (Dalt Vila) which is an UNESCO World Heritage Site. While wandering the cobbled streets and ancient ramparts, you’ll be able to learn about the long history and culture of Ibiza.

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      Enjoy Local Gastronomy

      You’re spoilt for choice when hungry in Ibiza! Enjoy classics such as suckling pig or salt-crusted fish at traditional restaurants, or dabble in the up and coming modern fusion eateries. There’s always a new and exciting culinary development happening in Ibiza, and the fresh organic produce means that every meal is a delight. If you prefer the simpler side of life, you can’t go wrong with some fresh seafood, grilled on the beach at sunset, served with lemon and salt.

    • salir-fiesta-ibiza.jpg
      Clubbing and Partying

      Ibiza is the world’s capital for clubbing and partying, and it’s something everyone should try! Ushuaïa Ibiza Beach Hotel is one of the top destinations in Playa d’en Bossa for party-goers, with international DJs and amazing light shows taking place everyday throughout the summer. For fantastic live music, many travelers go to enjoy the world-class sound system at Hard Rock Hotel Ibiza.

    • You can expect to pay around $8 dollars to rent a sun-lounger, and another $8 for an umbrella. Alternatively, you can bring your own umbrella and a big towel.
    • When eating from a chiringuito (beach bar) make sure your dish is served fresh and hot to lessen the risk of food poisoning.
    • It’s best to take cash with you when going to a market, but be careful not to flash it around. Be aware of pickpockets.
    • Remember to wear sunscreen - the Mediterranean sun can be fierce in the height of summer.
    • There are no common food diseases in Ibiza that you should be aware of, although some travelers choose to take a hepatitis vaccine before traveling just to be safe.
    • Haggling is essential in markets. Always originally offer much less than you intend to spend, and try to meet the vendor halfway. Don’t be afraid to walk away if the terms aren’t to your liking.
    • Although sleeping under the stars may sounds like a great idea, remember it’s illegal to sleep on the beaches in Ibiza.
    • Fish is one of the most popular foods in Ibiza, and is often used to flavour other dishes such as rice. If you’re allergic to fish or shellfish, be very careful about explaining this at restaurants to avoid an allergic reaction.
    • Don’t buy souvenirs at the airport - they’re likely to be much more expensive.
    • If you’d like to access some of the more remote beaches, it’s best to hire a car.
    • In terms of water safety, it is not advisable to drink the tap water in Ibiza. It is recommended that travellers buy bottled water, which is fairly inexpensive.
    • If shopping is your main priority, make sure to visit during September - the ‘rebajas’ or sales are where vendors get rid of their surplus stock, so you’ll have prices of 50% or less.
    • If you do get a stomach bug while travelling in Ibiza, make sure to stay hydrated. It’s always best to travel with rehydration salts, so that they’re easily available.
    • For buying essentials, try to shop where the locals do - in the more touristy areas, you’ll pay higher prices.
  • What to buy in Ibiza?
    Ibiza has been one of the most stylish places in the world for decades, with hippy markets, famous fashion boutiques, and a distinct bohemian aesthetic making it a popular destination for the modern trendsetter. Outside of its fashion-conscious wares, there’s also a wealth of products to browse, from carefully crafted local pottery to restored antiques. If you’re wondering what to buy in Ibiza, read on for our top spots!
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      Where to Shop in Ibiza

      Ibiza is a treasure trove for shoppers. Here are a few of the spots you can’t miss when deciding what to buy in Ibiza - as well as a few tips for making the most of your shopping experience.

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      Ibiza Town

      Despite being a relatively small city, Ibiza Town’s vast range of shops has made it a dream shopping destination for every style, taste and budget. Vara del Rey avenue has a great selection of both popular Spanish high-street brands and luxury boutiques. For those looking for something a little more unique, the cobbled streets of Dalt Vila are lined with an array of artisan and individual boutiques selling jewelry, bags and shoes. One of the great things about shopping in Ibiza Town is its opening hours, as many shops stay open as late as 10pm in the summer months.

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      Las Dalias market

      This is one of the biggest hippy markets in Ibiza, with countless stalls selling beautiful clothing from all over the world as well as jewelry, leather goods, and antiques. It’s open Saturdays all year round, and opens as a night market on Mondays and Tuesdays during the summer.

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      Forada Market

      Forada is a market selling local products, fruits and vegetables from Ibiza and handmade crafts. Open on Saturdays, some sellers usually play music to liven up the day.

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      Mercadillo Sant Jordi

      If you’re looking for a bargain, this car boot market is the one to visit. You may need to rummage a bit to find the gems, but you can expect to find anything here, from clothes to antiques to plants. It’s held on Sundays.

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      Casa Alfonso

      For food, visit the Casa Alfonso deli in San Antonio for anything you’d like to take with you from Ibiza - it’s been a family-run supermarket for over 100 years, and you can find delicious cheeses, meat products and wines here.

    • You can expect to pay around $8 dollars to rent a sun-lounger, and another $8 for an umbrella. Alternatively, you can bring your own umbrella and a big towel.
    • When eating from a chiringuito (beach bar) make sure your dish is served fresh and hot to lessen the risk of food poisoning.
    • It’s best to take cash with you when going to a market, but be careful not to flash it around. Be aware of pickpockets.
    • Remember to wear sunscreen - the Mediterranean sun can be fierce in the height of summer.
    • There are no common food diseases in Ibiza that you should be aware of, although some travelers choose to take a hepatitis vaccine before traveling just to be safe.
    • Haggling is essential in markets. Always originally offer much less than you intend to spend, and try to meet the vendor halfway. Don’t be afraid to walk away if the terms aren’t to your liking.
    • Although sleeping under the stars may sounds like a great idea, remember it’s illegal to sleep on the beaches in Ibiza.
    • Fish is one of the most popular foods in Ibiza, and is often used to flavour other dishes such as rice. If you’re allergic to fish or shellfish, be very careful about explaining this at restaurants to avoid an allergic reaction.
    • Don’t buy souvenirs at the airport - they’re likely to be much more expensive.
    • If you’d like to access some of the more remote beaches, it’s best to hire a car.
    • In terms of water safety, it is not advisable to drink the tap water in Ibiza. It is recommended that travellers buy bottled water, which is fairly inexpensive.
    • If shopping is your main priority, make sure to visit during September - the ‘rebajas’ or sales are where vendors get rid of their surplus stock, so you’ll have prices of 50% or less.
    • If you do get a stomach bug while travelling in Ibiza, make sure to stay hydrated. It’s always best to travel with rehydration salts, so that they’re easily available.
    • For buying essentials, try to shop where the locals do - in the more touristy areas, you’ll pay higher prices.