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Montego Bay Travel Guide - Discover Montego Bay

Leisure and Culture

  • What are the Best Beaches in Jamaica?
    Jamaica’s beaches are some of the most beautiful in the Caribbean. The long stretches of fine sand, bright blue waters, and gently waving palm trees make it the ideal place for a relaxing vacation. Here is a list of some of the best beaches in Jamaica - from the quiet and hidden ones to others zinging with local energy where you’ll find beach bars, cocktails, and relaxation at these picture-perfect destinations.
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      Fletcher Beach

      Fletcher Beach is a wide, large beach, where kids will be entertained for hours. Apart from the calm, tranquil waters, which are great for little ones to swim, there is a nearby water park with a variety of different activities such as go-karting and even a skating rink.

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      Doctor's Cave Beach

      Doctor’s Cave beach is one of the most popular beaches in Montego Bay, with travelers and tourists coming to swim in the crystal-clear water. It was made famous over a hundred years ago for its claimed healing properties - and now is a hotspot for beach bars, shops and some of the best sunsets to be seen in Jamaica. Also, it’s an ideal spot to go snorkeling right off the coast, as the beach forms part of the Montego Bay Marine Park.  

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      Cornwall Beach

      Cornwall Beach is just around the corner from Doctor’s Cave Beach, so it shares the same sparkling water but with fewer crowds. There are lockers and showers for public use, and for spicing up the afternoon after relaxing in the beach, the delicious street food and energizing live music of Gloucester Avenue is just a short walk away.

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      Seven Mile Beach

      Seven Mile beach is just as lovely as it sounds - seven full miles of white sands and azure waves. It’s also a great place to go for live music, as there are weekly reggae shows, and snack vendors offering pepper shrimp, roasted breadfruit, and other delicious wares.

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      Silver Sands

      Silver Sands is one of the hidden gems of Jamaica’s north shore - although it’s a public access beach, it’s kept beautifully clean, has fantastic views and there’s great snorkelling right off shoreline.

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      Mammee Bay Beach

      This private beach is the stuff of dreams - stocked with sun loungers, volleyball nets and rustic palm sunshades to hide under while sipping on a cocktail or enjoying some freshly grilled seafood. The shallow water creates ideal conditions for windsurfing, and there are a number of other watersports available - including jetskis and parasailing.

    • Don’t forget to bring sunscreen! The sun is strong here.
    • There are no problems with water safety in Jamaica, but travelers with sensitive stomachs should drink only bottled water if possible.
    • If you’re heading to a market, make sure to have cash on you, in small amounts. This will make it easier to haggle with vendors, and make sure that you aren’t a target for pickpockets.
    • If you’re going snorkeling, shop around before committing: different establishments will charge vastly different rates for the same equipment.
    • If you don’t like fishy flavours, make sure to avoid ‘sea cat punch,’ which is a drink made from octopus.
    • Don’t buy anything the first time you see it - reference a few other stalls or shops until you’re sure that it’s the best-quality option.
    • Make sure to carry a small amount of cash, as many beaches charge entry fees.
    • There are no serious food diseases in Jamaica to worry about, but only try the local delicacy ‘ackee’ at reputable restaurants - if not prepared correctly, it can be poisonous.
    • Some stallholders may be pushy, but don’t worry about standing firm and leaving if you aren’t interested in their wares.
    • When snorkelling or diving, make sure not to touch the coral - it’s essential for marine life to grow, and breaks easily.
    • If travelers do get diarrhea or food poisoning in Jamaica, it’s very important to keep hydrated. Drink bottled water with rehydration salts, and stick to plain food until feeling better.
    • Markets in Montego Bay are very busy on cruise ship days, which are usually Wednesdays and Fridays. Contact your hotel about the cruise schedule, and plan your trip on another day to avoid the crowds.
    • Most beaches are designated either for swimming or fishing, but some are licensed for both. Make sure not to wade through areas where active fishing is taking place.
    • Make sure to wash your hands regularly, and carry hand sanitizer or hand wipes to use before eating.
    • It’s usually possible to pay in US dollars, but make sure that you’re getting a fair exchange rate.
    • Never leave your bag or other valuables unattended.
    • Inspect the hygiene levels at any street stalls, and always make sure to eat hot, fully cooked food.
    • Don’t buy carved turtle shells or other marine souvenirs - they often have a negative impact on the environment.
  • What are the Best Excursions in Jamaica?
    Jamaica has a long and fascinating past - from the Arawak nation who first lived here, to the Spanish and West Indian people who followed, there are examples of the rich history embellished in the buildings and museums all over the country. It’s also the birthplace of international reggae legend Bob Marley, and many music lovers make a pilgrimage here to learn about his legacy. If you’d like to explore some excursions in Jamaica, here are some suggestions for day trips that will teach you more about the cultures and history that continue to shape this island.
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      Negril

      Negril, an area along Jamaica’s westernmost edge, is mostly known for the extensive Seven Mile Beach, where white sand and crystal water curve past beach bars, restaurants and some of the liveliest areas of the island. This is where travelers will find some of the best one day excursions in Jamaica - like snorkeling over the beautiful reef and marine life from a glass-bottomed boat.

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      Catadupa Mountains

      The Catadupa Mountains are a lush excursion from Montego Bay, where adventurers can enjoy panoramic views of the surrounding countryside. Birders will enjoy spotting the varied endemic species, such as black-billed parrots and crested quail-dove. There’s also the ruins of the old Catadupa Railway Station, a historic building built in 1895 with antique sash windows and beautiful glass-paneled timber frames.

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      Ocho Ríos

      Ocho Rios, in St Ann’s Parish, is known for being the home of one of Jamaica’s oldest forts. Built in the late 17th century, visitors can see the old cannons that were built due to fear of a French invasion in 1780 but were never fired. It’s also near to the quaint rural town of Nine Mile, where Bob Marley was born, and musical travelers can explore the important landmarks of his early life here.

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      Lucea

      Lucea is known for its quiet beaches and the fascinating Hanover Museum, which is home to artefacts from the Arawak civilisation as well as pottery and artwork celebrating the rich cultural history of Jamaica.

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      Falmouth

      Falmouth is a pretty town in Jamaica’s Trelawny Parish. It is home to some of the best-preserved examples of Georgian architecture in the Caribbean, where many of the buildings date from the late 1700s. It’s also a shopping hotspot due to its lovely open air market. For venturing beyond the city, it’s a great spot for taking a zipline and soaring over the treetops.

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      Appleton Estate

      This beautiful and historic distillery has been running since 1749, so it’s the perfect place to learn about making rum. Travelers will find out how rum used to be made before the island had electricity - and see the 200-year old copper stills. There are a number of rum varieties to try, and if the time is right there may even be an opportunity to taste some of their famous rum cake.

    • Don’t forget to bring sunscreen! The sun is strong here.
    • There are no problems with water safety in Jamaica, but travelers with sensitive stomachs should drink only bottled water if possible.
    • If you’re heading to a market, make sure to have cash on you, in small amounts. This will make it easier to haggle with vendors, and make sure that you aren’t a target for pickpockets.
    • If you’re going snorkeling, shop around before committing: different establishments will charge vastly different rates for the same equipment.
    • If you don’t like fishy flavours, make sure to avoid ‘sea cat punch,’ which is a drink made from octopus.
    • Don’t buy anything the first time you see it - reference a few other stalls or shops until you’re sure that it’s the best-quality option.
    • Make sure to carry a small amount of cash, as many beaches charge entry fees.
    • There are no serious food diseases in Jamaica to worry about, but only try the local delicacy ‘ackee’ at reputable restaurants - if not prepared correctly, it can be poisonous.
    • Some stallholders may be pushy, but don’t worry about standing firm and leaving if you aren’t interested in their wares.
    • When snorkelling or diving, make sure not to touch the coral - it’s essential for marine life to grow, and breaks easily.
    • If travelers do get diarrhea or food poisoning in Jamaica, it’s very important to keep hydrated. Drink bottled water with rehydration salts, and stick to plain food until feeling better.
    • Markets in Montego Bay are very busy on cruise ship days, which are usually Wednesdays and Fridays. Contact your hotel about the cruise schedule, and plan your trip on another day to avoid the crowds.
    • Most beaches are designated either for swimming or fishing, but some are licensed for both. Make sure not to wade through areas where active fishing is taking place.
    • Make sure to wash your hands regularly, and carry hand sanitizer or hand wipes to use before eating.
    • It’s usually possible to pay in US dollars, but make sure that you’re getting a fair exchange rate.
    • Never leave your bag or other valuables unattended.
    • Inspect the hygiene levels at any street stalls, and always make sure to eat hot, fully cooked food.
    • Don’t buy carved turtle shells or other marine souvenirs - they often have a negative impact on the environment.
  • Where to Have fun in Jamaica?
    A rich heritage, lively music culture and fun-loving people means that Jamaica is one of the highlights of the Caribbean social scene. If you’re wondering where to have fun in Jamaica, here are a few favourites to consider - from energetic dance parties to opportunities for learning about the arts, here are the unmissable events.
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      Carnival in Jamaica

      As one of the most highly anticipated fun events in Jamaica, Carnival includes several days of festivity. After street parades, beach parties and breakfast fetes, it all comes together with the Road March during Easter. This is the height of flamboyant fashion, with entertainers dressed up in feathers and glitter taking over the streets of Kingston with vibrant music and dancing.

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      Calabash Literary Festival

      This is a world-famous event, where internationally-acclaimed authors mingle with local writers for three days of readings, workshops, and mutual appreciation. Past attendees include Salman Rushdie, Wole Soyinka, and Man Booker prize winner Marlon James. It’s held every second year in late spring, the small, idyllic fishing village of Treasure Beach, and is a must-visit for any traveller with a love of the written word.

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      Ochos Rios Jazz Festival

      The Ochos Rios Jazz Festival has been running for many years in late May, with music lovers flocking from all over the globe to hear Jamaica’s finest perform. Though the festival is based in Ochos Rios, events take place all over the island, from free concerts in the gardens to jazz cruises at sunset.

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      Accompong Maroon Festival

      This is a heritage festival takes place in January and celebrates the culture and traditions of the Maroon community of escaped slaves who escaped deep into Jamaica’s mountains over 200 years ago. With singing, dancing, food and storytelling forming the basis of the entertainment, it’s an opportunity to find out more about the fascinating history of Jamaica and its people.

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      International Reggae Day

      If you’re wondering about where to party in Jamaica, this event in Kingston is all about the music that Jamaica introduced to the world. From a large open-air concert to environmental tree-planting initiatives, this July festival is about celebrating the earth and the ethos of reggae, and it often features international musicians paying homage to the late great Bob Marley.

    • Don’t forget to bring sunscreen! The sun is strong here.
    • There are no problems with water safety in Jamaica, but travelers with sensitive stomachs should drink only bottled water if possible.
    • If you’re heading to a market, make sure to have cash on you, in small amounts. This will make it easier to haggle with vendors, and make sure that you aren’t a target for pickpockets.
    • If you’re going snorkeling, shop around before committing: different establishments will charge vastly different rates for the same equipment.
    • If you don’t like fishy flavours, make sure to avoid ‘sea cat punch,’ which is a drink made from octopus.
    • Don’t buy anything the first time you see it - reference a few other stalls or shops until you’re sure that it’s the best-quality option.
    • Make sure to carry a small amount of cash, as many beaches charge entry fees.
    • There are no serious food diseases in Jamaica to worry about, but only try the local delicacy ‘ackee’ at reputable restaurants - if not prepared correctly, it can be poisonous.
    • Some stallholders may be pushy, but don’t worry about standing firm and leaving if you aren’t interested in their wares.
    • When snorkelling or diving, make sure not to touch the coral - it’s essential for marine life to grow, and breaks easily.
    • If travelers do get diarrhea or food poisoning in Jamaica, it’s very important to keep hydrated. Drink bottled water with rehydration salts, and stick to plain food until feeling better.
    • Markets in Montego Bay are very busy on cruise ship days, which are usually Wednesdays and Fridays. Contact your hotel about the cruise schedule, and plan your trip on another day to avoid the crowds.
    • Most beaches are designated either for swimming or fishing, but some are licensed for both. Make sure not to wade through areas where active fishing is taking place.
    • Make sure to wash your hands regularly, and carry hand sanitizer or hand wipes to use before eating.
    • It’s usually possible to pay in US dollars, but make sure that you’re getting a fair exchange rate.
    • Never leave your bag or other valuables unattended.
    • Inspect the hygiene levels at any street stalls, and always make sure to eat hot, fully cooked food.
    • Don’t buy carved turtle shells or other marine souvenirs - they often have a negative impact on the environment.
  • What to Eat in Jamaica
    Jamaica has fascinating local cuisine, with influences from East Asia, Britain, China and Spain. This history, combined with the abundance of fresh fruits, seafood, and herbs and spices mean that you’ll never have to worry about what to eat in Jamaica!
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      The best traditional food from Jamaica

      Saltfish and ackee is is the national dish of Jamaica. Ackee, a bright yellow-orange fruit that originated from Ghana, is boiled until tender and served with salted codfish, peppers, onions and tomatoes. Much more famous, however, is jerk chicken - after being marinaded with a spicy mix of Scotch bonnet peppers, thyme and allspice, chicken is smoked over green pimento branches, giving it the characteristic hot and smoky flavour recognised all over the world. In terms of Jamaican food that’s enjoyed every day, you have to try a mackerel rundown. This is a rich, spiced stew, where mackerel is simmered in coconut sauce until it ‘runs down’ to a thick consistency. Although mackerel is traditional, rundown can be made with shrimp, lobster or other types of fish. It’s often served with bammy, a fried cassava flatbread, to soak up the saucy flavour. There are a variety of traditional Jamaican delicacies served only on special occasions. One of these is curried goat, where after several hours of cooking, the meat becomes soft and tender. If you’re wondering what to eat in Jamaica when a sugar craving hits, the answer is gizzada - a delicious Jamaican pastry containing a filling of grated coconut, nutmeg and vanilla, sweetened with sugar and baked into a small pie shell.

    • hacer-sopa-caballa.jpg
      Mackerel rundown recipe

      Cut 2 pounds of mackerel into equal chunk-sized pieces, and remove bones (if any). Fry 1 chopped onion and 2 chopped cloves garlic together until translucent, then add 1 teaspoon thyme, 1 bay leaf and 1 whole Scotch bonnet chili pepper (optional). Turn down the heat and add 2 cans coconut milk - let this simmer for 15-20 minutes, or until it’s thickened by half. Add your fish and let it simmer until done, around 10 minutes.Serve with Jamaican rice and peas.

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      Liquors and drinks you must taste in Jamaica

      Rum is known as one of the best spirits in Jamaica! There’s a very strong brand called Overproof, which should be approached with caution due to its high alcohol content. Rather try a rum cocktail, served over ice with lime and ginger beer. Party animals will enjoy a Bob Marley shot - layers of strawberry syrup, creme de banana, and creme de menthe represent the red, yellow and green colours that are associated with Rastafarian culture. If you’re wondering what to drink in Jamaica without alcohol, Blue Mountain coffee is a must try. This coffee is highly sought after all over the world due to its low bitterness and intense aroma, and is only grown in one area of the island. Ginger beer is also very popular - this refreshing beverage is made using fresh cane sugar, rather than the corn syrup that is often used elsewhere.

    • Don’t forget to bring sunscreen! The sun is strong here.
    • There are no problems with water safety in Jamaica, but travelers with sensitive stomachs should drink only bottled water if possible.
    • If you’re heading to a market, make sure to have cash on you, in small amounts. This will make it easier to haggle with vendors, and make sure that you aren’t a target for pickpockets.
    • If you’re going snorkeling, shop around before committing: different establishments will charge vastly different rates for the same equipment.
    • If you don’t like fishy flavours, make sure to avoid ‘sea cat punch,’ which is a drink made from octopus.
    • Don’t buy anything the first time you see it - reference a few other stalls or shops until you’re sure that it’s the best-quality option.
    • Make sure to carry a small amount of cash, as many beaches charge entry fees.
    • There are no serious food diseases in Jamaica to worry about, but only try the local delicacy ‘ackee’ at reputable restaurants - if not prepared correctly, it can be poisonous.
    • Some stallholders may be pushy, but don’t worry about standing firm and leaving if you aren’t interested in their wares.
    • When snorkelling or diving, make sure not to touch the coral - it’s essential for marine life to grow, and breaks easily.
    • If travelers do get diarrhea or food poisoning in Jamaica, it’s very important to keep hydrated. Drink bottled water with rehydration salts, and stick to plain food until feeling better.
    • Markets in Montego Bay are very busy on cruise ship days, which are usually Wednesdays and Fridays. Contact your hotel about the cruise schedule, and plan your trip on another day to avoid the crowds.
    • Most beaches are designated either for swimming or fishing, but some are licensed for both. Make sure not to wade through areas where active fishing is taking place.
    • Make sure to wash your hands regularly, and carry hand sanitizer or hand wipes to use before eating.
    • It’s usually possible to pay in US dollars, but make sure that you’re getting a fair exchange rate.
    • Never leave your bag or other valuables unattended.
    • Inspect the hygiene levels at any street stalls, and always make sure to eat hot, fully cooked food.
    • Don’t buy carved turtle shells or other marine souvenirs - they often have a negative impact on the environment.
  • What are the Best Things to do in Jamaica?
    Jamaica is a wonderland for every kind of person- from the abundant green jungles to the exquisite sandy beaches, there’s something for everyone on this tropical island. For travelers who are interested in jumping into waterfalls, hiking through beautiful limestone hills or just admiring the vibrant flora and fauna, here are our top recommendations for what to do in Jamaica.
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      Explore the Blue Hole and Swim in the Secret Falls

      A trip to the Blue Hole is one of the best things to do in Jamaica - set in the tropical jungle is a series of waterfalls, beginning with a deep blue pool into which adventurous travelers can jump. After following the route of the river, there’s a secret cave hidden behind a sheet of clear water, as well as a tunnel to crawl through. It’s an exhilarating excursion, but anyone who is nervous about the prospect of jumping off any of the higher rocks can take advantage of the alternative ways to go down.

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      Hike Along the Incredible Dunn’s River Falls

      Ochos Rios is very close to the famous Dunn’s River Falls, one of the area’s most gorgeous natural highlights. It takes around an hour to climb the terraced levels of this waterfall, and the beachside cafeteria is perfectly situated for a snack afterwards. Another top excursion in Jamaica is river tubing down the nearby White River, which promises excitement without the physical exertion.

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      Canopy Ride at YS Falls

      This zip line excursion is one of the most exciting ways to experience active tourism in Jamaica. After a short walk to the top of the falls, travelers are strapped into a harness to soar above the canopy and admire the rich natural scenery from above on a series of thrilling canopy rides. Afterwards, there are deep pools at the bottom of the falls for relaxing, and sun loungers and gift shop in the area.

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      Boat Trip on the Black River

      The Black River winds its way down towards the southeast of Jamaica, where the lush mangroves are home to phenomenal birdlife as well as crocodiles - lucky travelers might even be able to see these prehistoric creatures up close from the boat as they’re often fed by tour guides.

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      Horseback Ride on the Beach and in the Caribbean Sea

      If you’re looking for what to do in Jamaica on a romantic holiday, riding a horse along the sandy Caribbean shore at sunset is one of the best options. Well-trained Arabian horses are suitable for even inexperienced riders, and riding a horse through the sea is a unique experience. It’s really possible to feel the power of these magnificent creatures, and the warm waters of Jamaica make it enjoyable for both horse and rider.

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      Hike Through the Cockpit Country

      Cockpit Country, right in the middle of Jamaica, is a fascinating limestone landscape with ravines and geological features which make it a must-visit for any avid hiker. It’s a sanctuary of natural beauty, with hiking routes that wind through some of Jamaica’s most interesting history, and is perfectly customisable depending on fitness level.

    • Don’t forget to bring sunscreen! The sun is strong here.
    • There are no problems with water safety in Jamaica, but travelers with sensitive stomachs should drink only bottled water if possible.
    • If you’re heading to a market, make sure to have cash on you, in small amounts. This will make it easier to haggle with vendors, and make sure that you aren’t a target for pickpockets.
    • If you’re going snorkeling, shop around before committing: different establishments will charge vastly different rates for the same equipment.
    • If you don’t like fishy flavours, make sure to avoid ‘sea cat punch,’ which is a drink made from octopus.
    • Don’t buy anything the first time you see it - reference a few other stalls or shops until you’re sure that it’s the best-quality option.
    • Make sure to carry a small amount of cash, as many beaches charge entry fees.
    • There are no serious food diseases in Jamaica to worry about, but only try the local delicacy ‘ackee’ at reputable restaurants - if not prepared correctly, it can be poisonous.
    • Some stallholders may be pushy, but don’t worry about standing firm and leaving if you aren’t interested in their wares.
    • When snorkelling or diving, make sure not to touch the coral - it’s essential for marine life to grow, and breaks easily.
    • If travelers do get diarrhea or food poisoning in Jamaica, it’s very important to keep hydrated. Drink bottled water with rehydration salts, and stick to plain food until feeling better.
    • Markets in Montego Bay are very busy on cruise ship days, which are usually Wednesdays and Fridays. Contact your hotel about the cruise schedule, and plan your trip on another day to avoid the crowds.
    • Most beaches are designated either for swimming or fishing, but some are licensed for both. Make sure not to wade through areas where active fishing is taking place.
    • Make sure to wash your hands regularly, and carry hand sanitizer or hand wipes to use before eating.
    • It’s usually possible to pay in US dollars, but make sure that you’re getting a fair exchange rate.
    • Never leave your bag or other valuables unattended.
    • Inspect the hygiene levels at any street stalls, and always make sure to eat hot, fully cooked food.
    • Don’t buy carved turtle shells or other marine souvenirs - they often have a negative impact on the environment.
  • What to Buy in Jamaica?
    Many travellers don’t know much about what to buy in Jamaica, seeing as it’s not famous for being a shopping hotspot. However, if you look in the right places, there are a number of lovely things to look out for when shopping in Jamaica, including carefully crafted baskets, woodwork and other art. You could also choose to take spices, coffee or cigars home so you can share a taste of the Caribbean with friends and family. If you’re visiting markets or buying Jamaica souvenirs from vendors on the beaches, be aware that often prices are inflated - it’s expected that you’ll have to haggle until you reach a lower amount that you’re comfortable with.
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      Where to Shop in Jamaica

      From locally-made arts and crafts to delicious treats, here are some ideas for travelers who’d like beautiful souvenirs or to take some Jamaican delicacies home with them.

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      Blue Mountain

      You can’t leave Jamaica without taking some of their world-renowned Blue Mountain coffee with you. There are several brands - if you don’t have the time to visit the actual mills, which are deep in the mountainous area of Jamaica, the coffee is also stocked at most supermarkets around town.

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      Cigar World

      A cigar is an excellent Jamaican souvenir that you can share with friends back home. Jamaica’s lush climate is perfect for growing tobacco, and this little shop in Ochos Rios stocks a variety of local options, as well as cigars from Cuba and the Dominican republic.

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      Montego Bay Craft Market

      This is a bustling, energetic place where you’ll find Jamaican handicrafts like coconut wine cups, knitted goods and woven baskets.

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      Wise Choice Wholesale

      This little shop in Negril makes their own spice mix, which is used all over the island to flavour jerk chicken and other delicious dishes. This is a great answer for what to buy in Jamaica if you’d like to try recreating a Jamaican recipe at home.

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      Gallery of West Indian Art

      This is home to a diverse range of paintings from Haiti, Cuba and Jamaica. There are also a number of high-quality wooden carvings of animals.

    • tropicana-jewelers.jpg
      Tropicana Jewelers

      Based in The Shoppes in Rose Hall, this jewelry store has a small selection of watches, rings, earrings of the highest quality. They also sell hook bracelets, which have been worn for centuries in the Caribbean and symbolise unity.

    • Don’t forget to bring sunscreen! The sun is strong here.
    • There are no problems with water safety in Jamaica, but travelers with sensitive stomachs should drink only bottled water if possible.
    • If you’re heading to a market, make sure to have cash on you, in small amounts. This will make it easier to haggle with vendors, and make sure that you aren’t a target for pickpockets.
    • If you’re going snorkeling, shop around before committing: different establishments will charge vastly different rates for the same equipment.
    • If you don’t like fishy flavours, make sure to avoid ‘sea cat punch,’ which is a drink made from octopus.
    • Don’t buy anything the first time you see it - reference a few other stalls or shops until you’re sure that it’s the best-quality option.
    • Make sure to carry a small amount of cash, as many beaches charge entry fees.
    • There are no serious food diseases in Jamaica to worry about, but only try the local delicacy ‘ackee’ at reputable restaurants - if not prepared correctly, it can be poisonous.
    • Some stallholders may be pushy, but don’t worry about standing firm and leaving if you aren’t interested in their wares.
    • When snorkelling or diving, make sure not to touch the coral - it’s essential for marine life to grow, and breaks easily.
    • If travelers do get diarrhea or food poisoning in Jamaica, it’s very important to keep hydrated. Drink bottled water with rehydration salts, and stick to plain food until feeling better.
    • Markets in Montego Bay are very busy on cruise ship days, which are usually Wednesdays and Fridays. Contact your hotel about the cruise schedule, and plan your trip on another day to avoid the crowds.
    • Most beaches are designated either for swimming or fishing, but some are licensed for both. Make sure not to wade through areas where active fishing is taking place.
    • Make sure to wash your hands regularly, and carry hand sanitizer or hand wipes to use before eating.
    • It’s usually possible to pay in US dollars, but make sure that you’re getting a fair exchange rate.
    • Never leave your bag or other valuables unattended.
    • Inspect the hygiene levels at any street stalls, and always make sure to eat hot, fully cooked food.
    • Don’t buy carved turtle shells or other marine souvenirs - they often have a negative impact on the environment.